The locomotives outlined here were all made by the Brooks Locomotive Works before the merger that created the American Locomotive Company.

CENTENNIAL ENGINE  

Built May, 1876    

Brooks #269  

Order #20  

Narrow Gauge

Whyte Wheel Arrangement: 2-6-0

Class: Mogul

11"x 16" cylinders

36" diameter driving wheels

The engine was shown at the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition

It was sold to Kerns City & Butler, January, 1877

CHICAGO & NORTHERN PACIFIC #24 

Built March, 1893  

Brooks #2264  

Order #487

Standard Gauge

Whyte Wheel Arrangement: 2-6-6T (tank, no tender)

Class: Suburban

18"x 24" cylinders

63" driving wheels

It was exhibited with eight other Brooks made locomotives at the 1893 Columbian Exposition at the Chicago World's Fair.

CINCINATTI & EASTERN #3   

Built May, 1877  

Brooks #305  

Order #45

Narrow Gauge

Whyte Wheel Arrangement: 4-4-0

Class: American

12"x 16"cylinders

60" diameter driving wheels

Sold to G.W. Campbell & Son in September, 1877

LAKE SHORE & MICHIGAN SOUTHERN #564 

Built December, 1891

Brooks #2011  

Order #484

Standard Gauge

Whyte Wheel Arrangement: 4-6-0

Class: 10 Wheeler

17"x 24" cylinders

68" diameter driving wheels

This engine set a speed record with a special passenger train on October 24, 1895, between Erie, Pa., and Buffalo, N.Y.

The train covered a distance of 86 mile in 70 minutes and 46 seconds, obtaining a maximum speed of 92.3 mph.

IlLLINOIS CENTRAL #640 

Built August, 1899  

Brooks #3298  

Order #707

Standard Gauge

Whyte Wheel Arrangement: 4-8-0

Class: 12 Wheeler

23"x 30" cylinders

57" driving wheels

This was the heaviest locomotive ever built at the time, weighing 232,200 pounds. 

It was designed to haul a train weighing 2,045 tons up a 3.8% grade with three degree curves at 15 mph.

CENTRAL OF NEW JERSEY #429 

Built March, 1899  

Brooks #3170  

Order #688

Standard Gauge

Whyte Wheel Arrangement: 4-8-0

21"x 32" cylinders  

55" diameter driving wheels

Known as a Camelback or Mother Hubbard locomotive, it was designed with a Wooten wide firebox to burn anthracite coal. This increased the overall weight on the driving wheels and provided the engineer with a better view forward.

Three types of locomotives were used on commuter railroads in New Jersey and eastern Pennsylvania.